Man threatens another with baton, gets knocked out

The man holding the baton made some errors:

  • Allowed his opponent to close the distance when he had a tool which needs more range.
  • Range can be managed by movement – he’s completely stationary.
  • Flat posture, straight back, very likely standing with knees locked straight, does not appear to be in any kind of stance which would prepare him to respond in the split second required to move, defend or attack. His opponent constantly adjusts.
  • Allowed opponent to grip his wrist. Difficult to swing baton effectively when grappling starts. The grip even from this position may allow opponent to stay off-centre when the baton swing comes.
  • Furtive glance made by opponent is a huge warning sign. He has already decided to attack at this point and is looking for witnesses, other enemies or allies which may factor in to his decision to go ahead.
  • Even if he decided to use the baton, it’s a poor weapon. Law enforcement use this as a method of pain compliance, and often need to move to other methods when it fails. Striking the legs is unlikely to instantly shatter kneecaps unless you’re very lucky/unlucky to hit that spot. You’re only starting the fight, not ending it. Swinging to the head would be a different matter.
  • Compare the above (pain compliance) to the punches thrown to the head (incapacitation).

Baton man seems to think intimidation is enough to keep him safe. The baton is like some kind of force field, everything else can be ignored.

From this position, when would he decide to use it? Once the fighting starts? Too late, too close. When the man fails to step back? This may be considered unjustified assault. Baton man then made a threat to seriously harm, which prompted an aggressive response. He put himself in a situation which is very difficult to win.

Man is stabbed in stomach, knocks out attacker

Knives do not immediately incapacitate – often, a person who has been stabbed is able to continue fighting for long enough to successfully retaliate, even if they die soon after. This makes knives both a poor choice for self defence, and a good choice for murder. A horrific way to fight since ancient times.

An important point to learn from this video: striking is an effective response to a knife attack, assuming that you are a capable striker. Many people tend to focus on the knife and fight to control it, not realising that this is as good a time as any to punch the face.

Belligerent man pushes woman, is stomped by 3 men

Belligerent man attempts to intimidate couple, pushing a female in the process. He seems to regret this a split second later as he reaches to hold and prevent her from falling.

Unfortunately he has already failed miserably to take stock of the situation he is in – alone, drunk, surrounded by bystanders who may not tolerate his behaviour.

Man overdoses and is revived by firefighter, kills the firefighter, uses female bystander as shield, is shot by police

A strong case for handcuffing and searching people who have overdosed before reviving them. Background info:

When the bus arrived at transit center, a bus passenger believed Houston was having a seizure and called 911 for help. Lundgaard arrived with other firefighters and began providing aid to Houston.

Houston regained consciousness after responders determined he likely had suffered a drug overdose and gave him two doses of Narcan.

Houston told responders he had taken some of his wife’s morphine. Houston got off the bus on his own, even as responders were encouraging him to seek additional medical care, but he refused.

“They wanted to make sure he got that help,” Tempelis said.

Houston drew a small handgun from a small case at his waist, Tempelis said. He stood back and fired twice, hitting Lundgaard in the upper back and Christensen in the upper leg.

Almost simultaneously, Christensen drew his handgun and fired once, striking Houston in the abdomen. Houston ran toward where bystander Brittany Schowalter was and used her as a shield, the district attorney said.

Christensen and Biese both fired multiple times at Houston, also likely striking Schowalter, although Tempelis said it’s impossible to know for sure who shot her. She suffered an injury to her leg and to her head, with a bullet grazing her skull, Tempelis said.

Houston eventually went to the ground, which allowed officers equipped with a ballistic shield to arrest him. The officers found Houston’s gun under him, Tempelis said.

Text source

How the knife can win vs the gun at close range. The 21 foot rule, also known as the Tueller Drill.

This video demonstrates some of the lesser-known mechanics of close-range combat between knife and gun.

Wikipedia:

The Tueller Drill is a self-defense training exercise to prepare against a short-range knife attack when armed only with a holstered handgun.

Sergeant Dennis Tueller of the Salt Lake City Police Department wondered how quickly an attacker with a knife could cover 21 feet (6.4 m), so he timed volunteers as they raced to stab the target. He determined that it could be done in 1.5 seconds. These results were first published as an article in SWAT magazine in 1983 and in a police training video by the same title, “How Close Is Too Close?”[1][2]

A defender with a gun has a dilemma. If he shoots too early, he risks being accused of murder. If he waits until the attacker is definitely within striking range so there is no question about motives, he risks injury and even death. The Tueller experiments quantified a “danger zone” where an attacker presented a clear threat.[3]

The Tueller Drill combines both parts of the original time trials by Tueller. There are several ways it can be conducted:[4]

  1. The (simulated) attacker and shooter are positioned back-to-back. At the signal, the “attacker” sprints away from the shooter, and the shooter unholsters his gun and shoots at the target 21 feet (6.4 m) in front of him. The attacker stops as soon as the shot is fired. The shooter is successful only if his shot is good and if the runner did not cover 21 feet (6.4 m).
  2. A more stressful arrangement is to have the attacker begin 21 feet (6.4 m) behind the shooter and run towards the shooter. The shooter is successful only if he was able take a good shot before he is tapped on the back by the attacker.
  3. If the shooter is armed with only a training replica gun, a full-contact drill may be done with the attacker running towards the shooter. In this variation, the shooter should practice side-stepping the attacker while he is drawing the gun.

MythBusters covered the drill in the 2012 episode “Duel Dilemmas”. At 20 ft (6.1 m), the gun-wielder was able to shoot the charging knife attacker just as he reached the shooter. At shorter distances the knife wielder was always able to stab prior to being shot.[5]

Cop shoots through windshield to stop killers during pursuit

The officer fumbles a reload near the end of the video. This happens when he passes his gun from his right hand into his left, and uses his right hand to unbuckle the seat belt. He then keeps holding the gun in his left hand, pulls out a magazine with his right and attempts to insert it the wrong way around. He has likely never or very rarely trained to reload his gun in this manner as it’s a fairly uncommon situation – firing a gun while driving and then unbuckling a seatbelt to exit the vehicle during a reload. Whenever something is attempted for the first time under stress, errors will almost certainly occur.

Summary of the incident below:

About two hours after a man was shot and killed near Eastern and Owens, officers attempted to stop the suspect’s vehicle but they did not comply. Officers followed the suspects, exchanging gunfire until the suspects crashed into a wall at Hollingworth Elementary School.

Kelly said one suspect, identified as Rene Nunez, 30, got out of the vehicle and ran up the stairs to the school. The door to the school was locked. The suspect in the passenger seat, identified as Fidel Miranda, 23, moved to the driver’s seat and started to move the vehicle back towards the officer’s car.

“Regarding shooting at or from a moving vehicle, our policy reads in part, it is policy of this department that officers will not discharge a firearm at or from a moving vehicle unless it is absolutely necessary to preserve human life,” Kelly said.

Officer Paul Solomon fired one round from a shotgun at Miranda. He was placed in handcuffs, provided medical attention but was ultimately pronounced dead at the scene.

Nunez, who was also injured in the shooting with police, was arrested and taken to University Medical Center for treatment, Kelly said.

Kelly said the suspects fired 34 rounds at officers. Officer William Umana fired 31 rounds at the suspects and Solomon fired one round.

Both officers were placed on routine paid administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation.